It’s all about the Bass

Draught Bass is not very easy to come by these days, particularly outside of the areas of Staffordshire and Derbyshire, so it is a great find when you enter a pub to see that famous red triangle. Fortunately for me there are at least three pubs near where I live that serve Bass on draught, one of which is actually in my home town. A reason for its rarity can be put down to the significant reduction in production of the ale from 800,000 barrels per annum in the 70’s to just 30,000-35,000 since 2005 when AB-InBev contracted the brewing of Bass to Marston’s. In it’s prime Bass Brewery was one of the largest breweries in the UK as well as in the world and its most famous beer, Bass Pale Ale, was once the highest selling beers in the UK with much of it exported around the British Empire. Founded in 1777 by William Bass, Bass Brewery was built in Burton-upon-Trent which became one of the most prestigious places to brew in Britain with over 30 breweries producing beer there. What made Burton special was the quality of the water, high in minerals and sulphur, it gave beers brewed with it a distinctive flavour as well as smell, or ‘Burton snatch’ as it is often described.

I first discovered Draught Bass in the city of Bath, just a short bus or train ride away from my home town, which is also famous for it’s water but for different reasons. Bath is best known as being a spa town since the Georgian era and this inspired the 16th Century architecture that can be seen throughout the city. Nestled within The Paragon, surrounded by the light, sandy coloured Bath stone Georgian houses, is The Star Inn. First licensed in 1760 The Star Inn, now owned by Bath brewery Abbey Ales, still retains many of its original features including the wooden benches and bar fixtures. CAMRA has described The Star Inn as having ‘a rare and unspoiled pub interior of outstanding historic interest’ and also made it onto their Inventory of Heritage Pubs. You certainly can feel the history when you step into The Star, the multi-room layout with its dark oak panelled walls and open fires is cosy and inviting. As I enter the door to the right of me is the Small Bar which has always been used by the pub’s regulars. Here there is a single bench which has been dubbed ‘Death Row’ and you can still pick up a complimentary pinch of snuff from tins on the ledge above, just as regulars have done since the 16th Century. As I follow the layout of the pub I get to the main bar area which is sectioned off into two spaces partitioned by a pair of original benches and a few sets of tables either side. At the bar as I gaze over the pump clips on the hand pulls I see the renowned red triangle logo of Bass which holds the title of the UK’s first registered trademark in 1876. As I order a couple of pints of Bass something happens that I haven’t seen before, my beer is served from a jug, something The Star Inn is still famous for. The Star doesn’t have a restaurant but they do serve typical pub grub including crisps, nuts, etc. and whilst at the bar I noticed that they also serve traditional, freshly made bread rolls with various fillings such as cheese & onion or ham & cheese.

As I sit down with my pint of Bass the first thing that hits me is a slight sulphurous smell, the Burton Snatch. In appearance the beer is a chestnut colour with very little carbonation and not much head. On first my first sip I noted how Bass tasted quite sweet as well as nutty. The mouthfeel was thinner than I was expecting so I very quickly had to take another sip to savour the flavour some more. On my next few sips the beer tasted more malty and reminded me of a slice of lightly browned toast. At 4.4% ABV this beer is perfectly sessionable to drink over the course of an afternoon and why wouldn’t you want to while away the time with a few pints of Bass next to a roaring fire? As I sit with my pint I look around at the old photo’s of Bath I find myself absorbed in the history of The Star Inn as well as in the beer I’m drinking.

Despite draught Bass being less popular now then it once was it still has a following. Many people around the country are joining together on the 11th April to shout about how much they love Bass during it’s national day of recognition. I should be sitting in The Star today for the 243rd anniversary of the brewery being established but the Coronavirus restrictions have meant I am sitting with a bottle of Bass in the garden. Although we will be unable to visit the pub on this glorious Saturday we can still raise a glass today and look forward to the postponed date for National Bass Day on Saturday 25th July when pubs will hopefully be reopened so we can properly appreciate a good pint of Bass.

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